CCM Alumni in 4 Tony-Nominated Productions

The nominees for the 73rd Annual Tony Awards have been announced, and the results are in: CCM’s stars shine bright on Broadway! CCM alumni are working on stage and behind-the-scenes in at least four Tony Award-nominated productions.

Tony Awards LogoSun Hee Kil (MFA Sound Design, 2009) was the associate sound designer for the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre’s production of Choir Boy, which was nominated for Best Play and Best Sound Design of a Play.

Two productions nominated for Best Musical feature CCM alumni. Adam Monley (BFA Musical Theatre, 2000) is a swing in the Marquis Theatre’s production of Tootsie, and the Winter Garden Theatre’s production of Beetlejuice features choreography by Connor Gallagher (BFA Musical Theatre, 2006), as well as performances by Leslie Kritzer (BFA Musical Theatre, 1999) as Delia, Ryan Breslin (BFA Musical Theatre, 2011) as an ensemble member and Sean Montgomery (BFA Musical Theatre, 2007) as a swing.

Kritzer was awarded CCM Musical Theatre’s 2011 Young Alumni Award, and her role in Beetlejuice has also earned her nominations for a Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical, an Outer Critics Circle Award for Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical and a Chita Rivera Award for Outstanding Female Dancer in a Broadway Show.

Preston Truman Boyd (BFA Musical Theatre, 2008) and Christine Cornish Smith (BFA Musical Theatre, 2013) are both in the ensemble for Studio 54’s Kiss Me, Kate, which was nominated for Best Revival of a Musical.

This year’s Tony Awards will be hosted by James Corden at 8 p.m. Eastern on Sunday, June 9 on CBS. For more information, visit tonyawards.com.

Are you a CCM alum with news? Stay in touch by sharing your story with us!

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Story by CCM Graduate Student Alexandra Doyle

CCM Alumni Applause CCM News Student Salutes

CCM Grand Uses Arts to Strengthen Bonds Between Grandparents and Children

The University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music Preparatory and Community Engagement (CCM Prep) is thrilled to announce CCM Grand, its first intergenerational arts program for families. Creativity has no age limit in this summer workshop, which runs from July 24-26, 2019.

Alumni grandparents and their grandchildren (ages 8-13) are invited to return to UC for a unique, fun-filled arts experience. This camp is designed to create lasting memories and strengthen the special bond that exists between generations.

CCM Grand offers grandparents the opportunity to spend quality time embedded within a rich and creative learning environment with their grandchildren. Grandparents who previously attended UC can explore and re-familiarize themselves with our inspiring campus, which is among the world’s most beautiful campuses according to Forbes Magazine.

During this camp, attendees will actively participate in engaging arts workshops taught by renowned CCM Prep and collegiate faculty, tour the UC campus and experience life on campus at the newly renovated Marian Spencer Hall. Tuition is $350 per person, which includes all activities, on-campus housing and six meal vouchers for the campus dining hall.

Register for CCM Grand online at: https://bit.ly/2EhxS6m

For more information, call the CCM Prep office at 513-556-2595 or email Amy Dennison at Amy.dennison@uc.edu.

Looking for more summer arts opportunities for your family? CCM Prep offers a variety of music, dance and theatre arts programs for youth, teens and adults. Learn more about CCM Prep’s Summer 2019 offerings.

CCM News Faculty Fanfare Student Salutes
A picture of CCM faculty member Donald Hancock holding his Emmy Award.

Emmy Award-Winning Producer Donald Hancock is Named Assistant Professor of Film and Television Production at CCM

CCM Dean Stanley E. Romanstein has announced the appointment of Donald Hancock to the position of Assistant Professor of Film and Television Production in CCM’s Division of E-Media. Hancock joined CCM’s faculty as an adjunct in 2012. His new appointment will begin on Aug. 15, 2019.

A picture of CCM faculty member Donald Hancock holding his Emmy Award.

Hancock is an Emmy Award-winning producer, professor and an active member of the media community. He has an MA in Film and Television from Savannah College of Art and Design and a BFA in E-Media from CCM. Hancock currently works as a producer at CET, Cincinnati’s PBS Member Station. He has produced “The Art Show,” CET’s weekly art magazine program, since 2013. He also produces content for a variety of partners with CET, including ArtsWave and the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra.

Hancock won a Regional Emmy Award for “Cincinnati’s Music Hall: The Next Movement,” a 60-minute documentary that he co-wrote, produced and shot. The documentary details the historic $150 million renovation of Cincinnati’s National Historic Landmark. Watch a promotional spot for the documentary below.

In 2013, Hancock was chosen as one of 25 producers from around the country to participate in the PBS/CPB Producer’s Academy, whose goal is to engage a talented pool of diverse producers in public broadcasting. Hancock has also partnered with WGBH and PBS to produce content around national programming including “Finding Your Roots,” “American Experience” and “Downton Abbey.”

For the past seven years, Hancock has been an adjunct professor at CCM, teaching Digital Video and Integrated Media Production courses to sophomore and junior-level students. In his spare time, he serves on the Executive Board for the UC Center for Film and Media Studies, as well as the community advisory board at Elementz Urban Arts Center. He is a member of the National Association of Black Journalists, a member of the Broadcast Education Association and volunteers as a Big Brother in the Big Brother Big Sisters Program.

Dean Romanstein thanked search committee members Kevin Burke (chair), Peter DePietroJohn HebbelerTondra Holt and Hagit Limor for their work on finding CCM’s new Assistant Professor of Film and Television Production.

Please join us in congratulating Donald Hancock on his new appointment!

CCM Alumni Applause CCM News Faculty Fanfare

CCM Acting Presents New Play ‘Association of Controlled Dreamers’

Admission to the play is free, but reservations are required. Tickets become available at 12:30 p.m. on Monday, April 22, 2019.

CCM concludes its 2018-19 Studio Series with MJ Kaufman’s Association of Controlled Dreamers on April 25-27, 2019, in Cohen Family Studio Theater.

In the play, a young, charismatic senator pursues policies that could have long-lasting repercussions for public education. A group of college students tries every technique available to them to change his mind, from occupying his lawn to collective lucid dreaming.

“The play is about students fighting for affordable education,” says Brant Russell, the show’s director. “The play also resonates with our current political and educational circumstances in that many college students feel as though they have little power over the institutions that rule their worlds. If students wish to be heard, they sometimes have to resort to less traditional means of communication.”

CCM commissioned Kaufman, who is a staff writer on Netflix’s The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, to write Association of Controlled Dreamers for the college’s summer Playwrights Workshop in 2017. Students presented a reading of the play as part of the workshop, but now audiences can see the fully-staged version.

While the subject matter addresses serious and modern societal concerns, Russell notes that the production doesn’t lose its humor. “The play is funny (really funny), moving, and relies on what’s best about CCM: students collaborating to create something greater than the sum of its parts.”

Performances of Association of Controlled Dreamers take place April 25-27, 2019, in CCM’s Cohen Family Studio Theater.

Admission is free, but reservations are required. Tickets become available at 12:30 p.m. on Monday, April 22. Visit the CCM Box Office or call 513-556-4183 to reserve. Limit two tickets per order.
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Creative Team

  • Brant Russell, director
  • Andrew Wright, lighting designer
  • Hannah Gruneisen, master electrician
  • Maya Hughes, assistant master electrician/board operator
  • Will Graham, stage manager
  • Cole Nevins, assistant stage manager
  • Leah Berry, production assistant
  • Emma Heath, production assistant
  • Ryan Hurt, sound designer
  • Dan DeGroh, composer/musician

Cast List

  • Rin Wallace as Brittany
  • Annie Jacques as Tara
  • Paige Jordan as Vera
  • Zoe Cotzias as Amber
  • Michelle Jardine as Amaryllis
  • Madison Pullman as Mary
  • Amanda Nelson as Mother
  • Briley Oakley as Social Media
  • Sierra Coachman as Secret Girlfriend
  • Cameron Nalley as Sammy
  • Jason Pavlovich as Tom
  • Reid Robison as Edward
  • Matt Fox as Senator/Twin
  • Frankie Chuter as Job Man
  • Sydney Miles as Rhonda/Hope

Performance Times

  • 8 p.m. Thursday, April 25
  • 8 p.m. Friday, April 26
  • 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday, April 27

Location
Cohen Family Studio Theater, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Admission
Admission is free, but reservations are required. Tickets become available at 12:30 p.m. on Monday, April 22. Visit the CCM Box Office or call 513-556-4183 to reserve. Limit two tickets per order.

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for more information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.
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Acting Studio Series Sponsor: Neil Artman and Margaret Straub

Story by CCM Graduate Student Jonathan Dellinger

CCM News Faculty Fanfare Student Salutes

CCM Offers Arts Classes to all UC Students in Fall 2019

 

CCM offers dozens of different general studies and fine arts elective courses in fall 2019. These credit-granting courses are open to all UC students and cover a wide range of topics including dance, movies and media, music and theatre arts!

Master the hip-hop dance moves seen in current music videos or learn the basics of modern dance and ballet in CCM’s dance classes. Film a digital video or binge-watch classic movies, Disney animated musicals and TV sitcoms in movie and media appreciation classes.

CCM’s music appreciation classes cover the music of Woodstock, The Beatles, Japanese Pop and more, or students can study women’s impact on music and the impact of music on politics. Students can also join UC Choruses or UC Symphony Orchestra, turn their laptops into musical instruments and jam with a virtual band, or learn how to play the piano and guitar in hands-on music performance classes.

In theatre appreciation classes students can study the history of theatre, explore how Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton revolutionized musical theatre, learn the craft of acting or stage design and more!

CCM’s fall 2019 arts elective classes are offered online or in person; view a complete list of class offerings below. Register for classes at https://www.catalyst.uc.edu.

Dance Performance Classes

Advanced Intermediate Ballet I (3 credits)
FAM 1020-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 2-3:20 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

This course is intended for non-Dance majors with prior training in classical ballet at the advanced/intermediate level. It is repeatable and is offered each semester. The ballet class will consist of a traditional ballet barre followed by center practice and enchainment following the usual progression. A preexisting knowledge of the ballet French terminology is required in addition to the physical mastery and overall knowledge of classical ballet expected at the advanced/intermediate level.
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Beginning Ballet I (3 credits)
FAM 1015-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
FAM 1015-002 (Tuesday/Thursday, 7:30-8:50 p.m.)
FAM 1015-003 (Tuesday/Thursday, 2-3:20 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

This is an introductory course for any non-major wishing to learn the fundamentals of classical ballet technique. It is a studio course, meaning students will be in the dance studio, in full attire (leotard, tights, ballet slippers for women/ white T-shirt, tights and ballet shoes for men) learning the essentials of a traditional classical ballet class. We will study the French terminology associated with the movement and poses we dance in order to better facilitate learning and comprehension of the movement. Mind/body awareness will be facilitated while a more thorough knowledge of the art form including historical perspective, origin and philosophical issues as to its importance in today’s cultural world will also be discussed.
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Ballet Conditioning for Athletes and Dance Team (3 credits)
FAM 1019-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 8-9:20 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

This is a beginning level ballet course designed especially for athletes and dance team members. As well as focusing on increasing the skill and artistry level within the parameters of classical ballet, the student will also learn to understand the historical perspectives of the art form and the value it has to the culture of society. Within the framework of the traditional ballet class, students will focus on developing strong core muscles, as well as lengthening and toning the body with additional mat work and conditioning exercises, as part of the conditioning program. Daily proper attire is expected for this class. Exercise bands and mat or towel are also required.
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Beginning Modern Dance I (3 credits)
FAM 1025-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 10:10-11:05 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

In this course for non-dance majors, students are introduced to the techniques and movement vocabulary of contemporary and modern dance. Students will explore fundamental movement principles while emphasizing the development of improvisational and performance skills. The student will also develop the critical perspectives necessary to analyze and further appreciate dance as an art form and educational tool with cultural values.
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Dance Appreciation – Online (3 credits)
FAM 1095-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking

This online course introduces dance as a performing art, focusing on the Western European and American dance forms of Ballet, Modern and Contemporary. The course will trace their development, historical development and cultural characteristics. Additional course topics will include viewing live dance performances.
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Hip Hop Dance (1 credits)
FAM 1030-001 (Monday, 5:30-6:30 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

A beginning/intermediate level dance course with no experience required. This class is designed to teach the fundamentals of Hip-Hop through choreographed dances. Hip-Hop style similar to that seen on current music videos will be the style taught in class. Individual work, floor work and partner work will be emphasized. Combinations will be performed to Rap and R & B music.
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Intermediate Ballet I (3 credits)
FAM 1017-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 3:30-4:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

This is a ballet course designed for dancers with previous ballet training. It is a repeatable course for the non-major wishing to further pursue the complexities and artistic nuances of classical ballet technique. It is a studio course, meaning students will be in the dance studio, in full attire (leotard, tights, ballet slippers for women/ white T-shirt, tights and ballet shoes for men) learning the essentials of a traditional classical ballet class. We will study the French terminology associated with more complex movement and positions we dance in order to better facilitate learning and comprehension of the movement. Mind/body awareness will be facilitated while a more thorough knowledge of the art form including historical perspective, origin and philosophical issues as to its importance in today’s cultural world will also be discussed.
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Intermediate Modern Dance I (3 credits)
FAM 1027-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday 9:05-10 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

A one semester, repeatable (by audition or permission of instructor) course for non-dance majors, providing a more sophisticated approach to the techniques and movement vocabulary of contemporary and modern dance. Students will also continue to explore and further develop fundamental movement principles while emphasizing the cultivation of improvisational and performance skills. The student will also develop the critical perspectives necessary to analyze and further appreciate dance as an art form and educational tool within our society.
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Legends of Dance – Online (3 credits)
FAM 1094-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

This course introduces dance legends of Ballet, Modern and Contemporary Dance, their significant contribution to the world of dance in America, as well as the passion and insight that brought the legends to their height of success. Additional course topics include viewing live dance performances.
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Modern Dance Basics – Online (3 credits)
FAM 1022-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

In this course for non-dance majors, students are introduced to the techniques and movement vocabulary of contemporary and modern dance. Students will explore fundamental movement principles while emphasizing the development of improvisational and performance skills. The student will also develop critical perspectives necessary to analyze and further appreciate dance as an art form and educational tool with cultural values. Through interactive online instruction students use recording devices (e.g., smartphones, laptops, and camcorders) to develop their dance technique while building a dance community. To complete assignments students may film the dances with friends and/or family in locations of their choosing. (e.g., dorm room, apartment, basement, backyard, park, and riverside). Students may also utilize the 414 Video Production Room in Langsam Library.
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Movie and Media Appreciation Classes

Art of Recording (3 credits)
FAM 1050-001 (Monday, 4:30-7:20 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy

Art of Recording focuses on the basic technical musical understanding needed to engage music at progressively deeper levels of understanding. Starting from simple listening experiences you will soon be able to appreciate what it means to be an “expert listener.” A musician learns the function musical scales; a painter, the knowledge paint and brushes; a writer, the craft of words and sentences. The expert listener integrates specific gateways that can reveal the depths of sound possibilities. This course expresses the Art of Recording from basic sound physics, music and brain functions as they pertain to the technology used in producing the popular music we love over the last five decades.
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Digital Audio for Non-Majors (3 credits)
EMED 2007-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 3:30-4:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking KI Knowledge Integration

This course is designed to introduce the student to the fundamentals of digital audio theory and practices through the development of basic digital audio production projects. Course topics include general production principles and theory of operation of digital audio workstations with an emphasis placed on internet radio, podcast, and commercial production processes. The student will be introduced to basic audio production techniques through the corresponding laboratory phase of this course. The student will be required to demonstrate knowledge of the principles of audio production and apply those principles in laboratory exercises. Prerequisite Definition: To take this course you must: Have taken the following Courses EMDT1011C min grade D-, or EMED1005 min grade D-, or EMED1015 min grade D-.
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Digital Video for Non-Majors (3 credits)
EMED 2002-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas:  CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking KI Knowledge Integration

The medium of digital video has become an increasingly pervasive means of communication in contemporary culture. Digital Video allows students to apply media aesthetic theory, processes and techniques in communicating their ideas to a specified audience via the digital video production process. While taking this course, each student is required to write, produce, shoot, and edit several projects using digital video cameras, working in a digital nonlinear editing environment, and delivering their content through a variety of digital distribution channels to a specified audience. Prerequisite Definition: To take this course you must: Have taken the following Courses EMDT1011C min grade D-, or EMED1006 min grade D-, or EMED1016 min grade D-.
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Disney Animated Musicals (3 credits)
FAM 2090-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 12:30-1:50 p.m.; Tuesday, 2-4 p.m.)
FAM 2090-002 (Tuesday/Thursday, 11 a.m.-12:20 p.m.; Tuesday, 2-4 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts

This course explores the genre of the animated film musical with a special emphasis on its presumed originator, the Walt Disney Studios. We will consider the unique expressive properties of this form, examining the ways in which both song and the animated medium distort, rearrange, and reflect the world for its audiences. As we trace the genre’s history and evolution from the earliest experiments with sound technology to the latest multi-billion-dollar franchises, we will simultaneously track shifting trends in popular song and film. This history will run alongside discussions of Disney’s complex and often problematic roles as a purveyor of American and global entertainment.
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Foundations of Digital Media (3 credits)
DMC 1000-001 (Monday, 2-4:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy, KI Knowledge Integration, SR Social Responsibility

Introduces the field of Digital Media and Cinematic Arts, the faculty who teach it and the professionals who practice it. Faculty members will present their research and relate that topic to the wider field of Digital Media and Cinematic Arts. Professionals will present their work and relevant projects. This course encourages students to clarify their course of study and build connections with faculty, professionals and students with similar interests.
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Going to the Movies: 20th Century Classics (3 Credits)
EMED 1075-001 (Tuesday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy, KI Knowledge Integration, SR Social Responsibility

Through lectures and screenings of classic films students will explore the evolution of the motion picture as a unique and significant form of expression. The course includes investigation into film style and structure, distribution and consumption. Students will be guided in the development of aesthetic criteria for critical examination.
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Integrated Media Production 1 for Non-Majors (3 credits)
EMED 1015-001 (Online)
EMED 1015-002 (Monday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: TI Technology and Innovation, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy

Media convergence is a vital component of our new media culture. In new media there is a melding of production, design and message with user-experience. Integrated Media Production I is an introductory course — the first of a two-course sequence within the E-Media major at CCM — that provides students with a theoretical and practical foundation in the intersecting worlds of digital media production, content development and new media design. This course is an overview of concepts and processes in convergent media production.
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Jammin’ with Laptops (3 credits)
FAM 2014-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 11 a.m.-noon)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration
This course will explore the potentials of laptop computers for music making. Various technical topics, including analog v. digital sound, audio software, effects, gear, MIDI and audio programming languages will be surveyed. In addition, a survey of the history of computer music will be conducted by way of an investigation into seminal readings and recordings. Both of these inquiries will provide participants.
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Jammin’ with Laptops – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2023-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SE Social and Ethical Issues, CM Effective Communication, SR Social Responsibility
In this course, you will play, record, and make music with online instruments. There are three units, and each unit includes a distinctive music making session; Individual Session (Unit 1), Collaborative Session (Unit 2), and Creative Jam Session (Unit 3 In the Unit 1, you will individually study the basic knowledge of music making, including identifying musical instruments, playing online instruments, and recording the music that you played through the exercises. In the Midterm Exam, you will be asked to answer the basic knowledge that you have learned so far. In the Unit 2 and 3, you will form your laptop band with your online classmates to play and record music together. In the Unit 2, you will collaborate with 1~2 classmate(s) to complete the assignment together. In the Unit 3, you will collaborate with 2~4 classmates to create your own band under your instruction to direct your band members, and play for your band member’s music under their respective directions. In the Final Exam, you will be asked to answer all the materials that you have learned.
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Japanese Pop, Anime and Video Game Music – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2050-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts DC Diversity and Culture, CM Effective Communication

You will learn the evolution of Japanese Pop, Anime, and Video Game Music (post 1980) including anime theme songs, video game music, and popular songs. Each topic will provide the composer’s biography, historical background and word-by-word translation of lyrics, and will investigate the cultural differences between Japan and America.
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The Evolution of the Television Comedy (3 credits)
EMED 1050-001 (Wednesday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, HU Humanities and Literature, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy, KI Knowledge Integration, SR Social Responsibility

Through lectures and screenings of classic scenes and episodes, students will explore the American television comedy as a significant form of storytelling, as a uniquely elastic form of expression and contemporary critique, and as an exceptionally creative and influential art. The course includes investigation into comedy and sitcom style and structure, as well as historical and societal context and impact. Students will be guided in the development of aesthetic criteria for critical examination. This course is focused in the historical and cultural development of television comedies from their pre-TV origins to their contemporary manifestations. Students will develop the strategies for reading media properly while also investigating the historical, literary, cultural and aesthetic contributions of television to 20th and 21st century art forms.
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Music Appreciation Classes

American Music – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2006-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, HP Historical Perspectives, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking
An online history of music in America c. 1620 to the present. Musical life as we experience it in the USA today is the product of a history that is in many ways unique, but never far from world-wide influences. This course surveys a wide variety of music along with the social, political, and religious movements that have shaped American musical life right up to the present. Examines the contributions of numerous cultural groups, regional developments over four centuries, and the ways music reflects values, aspirations, and problems of the population. Course topics include musical genres, styles, personalities, and trends. Musical examples, discussions, quizzes, and videos are all online. No prior experience with music required.
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Experimental Rock ‘60s and ‘70s (3 credits)
FAM 2013-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 1:30-2:50 p.m.)
FAM 2013-002 (Online: 8/26-10/15, 1st half semester)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, DC Diversity and Culture, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration

This course will provide a detailed overview of the tools, techniques and musical styles which had a tremendous impact on the aesthetic of various genres of Rock Music in the 1960s and 70s, the resonance of which can be observed in many mainstream and non-mainstream musical trends of the last 30 years. It will begin with an examination of multi-tracking tape machines: their development and techniques such as sound on sound, tape-delay and flange, which had become standard practice in studios by the late 1960s. This is followed by a technical overview of electronic instruments, specifically the synthesizer, whose development will be traced from the Theremin. Musical trends such as the 1950s avant-garde and Minimalism will serve as a bridge to examinations of seminal bands such as the Beatles, Pink Floyd, Kraftwerk, Can, Neu:, Brian Eno and the Talking Heads among others; the technical knowledge gained from the initial lectures on tape techniques and electronic instruments will be used to gain a deeper understanding of the music of these artists.
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Hamilton: A Musical Theatre Revolution (3 credits)
FAM 2075-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, DC Diversity and Culture, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration, SR Social Responsibility

Lin-Manuel Miranda’s musical, Hamilton, has been credited as revolutionary and a game changer in the history of the American musical since its off-Broadway opening in 2015. This course explores the revolutionary aspect of this musical, covering song and plot conventions of musical theater as they appear in musicals from the 1920s to the present and investigating how Miranda employs, challenges, and transforms them in Hamilton. We will also consider Hamilton among other “history musicals,” its relationship with popular music (especially hip-hop and socio-political issues of race and ethnicity derived from Miranda’s choice to offer a multi-racial cast to represent the Founding Fathers. We will thus contextualize Hamilton in musical theater history and investigate what aspects of the musical are conventional and which ones are original.
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History of Rock ‘n’ Roll – Online (3 Credits)
FAM 3031-001
FAM 3031-002
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking

Rock and Roll had humble beginnings in the Southeastern United States, but over time it developed into a force, beyond mere entertainment, that has defined youth culture on a global scale. Rock and roll culture is embedded in the fabric of youth identity. Rock and roll music is a commodity that young people use daily, often with an obsessive devotion. Marketing campaigns that target youth are so relentless that young people are under enormous media and social pressure to join the ranks of consumers. The goal of History of Rock and Roll is, therefore, threefold: 1. To provide for students a chronological survey that examines the relationship between the music, its most successful and colorful artists, the associated recording technology, and the impact of the genre on American culture. 2. Through critical listening and reading, the course will provide students with useful, evaluative tools so that they can make historically informed and thoughtful decisions about the music they select and enjoy. 3. Finally, the course will encourage students to seek and appreciate new styles, and perhaps inspire those who seek a career as a pop music artist. No prerequisite.
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Japanese Pop, Anime and Video Game Music – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2050-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts DC Diversity and Culture, CM Effective Communication

You will learn the evolution of Japanese Pop, Anime, and Video Game Music (post 1980) including anime theme songs, video game music, and popular songs. Each topic will provide the composer’s biography, historical background and word-by-word translation of lyrics, and will investigate the cultural differences between Japan and America.
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Jazz Appreciation (3 credits)
FAM 2051-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
FAM 2051-002 (Tuesday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, DC Diversity and Culture, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration

A one-semester overview of America’s true art form: jazz. The course will introduce students to the various styles of jazz, its major performers, its history and origins, and will also involve attending jazz performances at CCM or elsewhere.
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Live at CCM (2-3 credits)
FAM 1060-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration

Through this course, students will have the opportunity to experience concerts at CCM in a directed environment. Learn about a broad range of music and style through exposure to a wide variety of instrumental ensembles. Attend orchestral, wind ensemble, choral, jazz and contemporary music programs and more with the chance to discuss and write about them through interaction with knowledgeable graduate assistants and the directors of the respective ensembles themselves.
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Music and Politics (3 credits)
FAM 2018-001 (Monday/Wednesday, 11:15-12:35 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SE Social and Ethical Issues, CM Effective Communication, KI Knowledge Integration
This course examines the impact of music on politics during the last 100 years in the contemporary classical realm, as well as folk and popular musical styles. Students will become familiar with prominent politically influenced musicians and composers such as Fela Kuti, Woody Guthrie, Bob Marley, and Frederic Rzewski. Also, this class will cover the impact on music from major political and historical events throughout the century, such as World War II’s influence on jazz, or the life and career of Dmitri Shostakovich under Stalin’s Soviet Union. By studying the biographies and major works of this broad spectrum of musicians, students will be able to outline the diverse characteristics of politically oriented music.
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Music Appreciation – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2005-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, DC Diversity and culture, CM Effective Communication

An online course that introduces students to a wide range of music in the Western World, covering several historical periods, including our own time. Examines musical styles, musical terms, composers, and other aspects of the music listening experience. Considers the historical and cultural context of musical activity and the way it has shaped the musical life from medieval Europe up to the present in our own communities. Students will discuss their own experiences with music and have the opportunity to attend a musical performance of their choice, near where they live, for class credit. Musical examples, discussions, quizzes, videos, and film are all online. No prior experience with music required.
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Music of the Beatles (3 credits)
FAM 2061-001 (Online)
FAM 2061-002 (Online)
FAM 2061-003 (Tuesday/Thursday, 12:30-1:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SE Social and Ethical Issues, CM Effective Communication, KI Knowledge Integration

The Music of the Beatles has made an impact in the whole world both musically and sociologically. The Beatles are considered one of the most influential bands of any era. Their music reflects the cultural and social revolution of the 1960s and serves as a model for understanding all subsequent popular music. This class will chronologically trace the development of the Beatles from their early days through the band’s dissolution. There will be analysis of selected compositions with regard to lyrics, harmony, song structure, instrumentation, and arranging. This class will examine their groundbreaking production techniques, individual writing styles, and the impact of their music on other musicians and social trends.
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Music of Woodstock (3 credits)
FAM 2070-001 (Tuesday, 6-8:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SE Social and Ethical Issues, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration

The course thoroughly examines the musical artists and the works they performed at history’s most iconic pop music festival, Woodstock (officially the “Woodstock Music and Art Fair”). As many as half a million people or more, descending on a dairy farm in upstate New York in August of 1969 for “three days of peace and music,” were treated to a wildly diverse lineup of musicians and artists hailing from no less than five different continents. The Woodstock Festival is the perfect prism through which to view the 1960s popular scene, when various streams of musical genres converged to forge a new breed of “pop”; the soundtrack of the counterculture and a young, idealistic generation. How did a music festival, let alone pop music in general, become a catalyst for social, political, and artistic change and upheaval? How was the motley assortment of musicians of various stripes, genres, genders, and ethnicities received by the crowd, temporarily the fourth-largest city in New York? How did this crowd co-exist and survive without virtually any of the realities that plague a similar-sized urban center? These are just a few of the many questions posed in this course as we study and—equally as important—savor and experience the musical performances of the 1969 Woodstock Festival.
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Talking about Music (3 credits)
FAM 1102-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 3:35-4:30 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts
This course will explore contemporary musical topics through dialogue and reflection. Themed weeks will investigate the intersection of philosophy, aesthetics, and culture as they pertain to the musical experience. Within these three broad concepts, diverse topics (posed as questions) will range from the existential (What is Music?) to the social (Where do you find music?) to the economic (What is a fair way to pay creators for their music?). All are designed to focus and enrich the musical experience, while broadening student awareness of the music industry and endeavoring to answer questions that don’t fit neatly into traditional music course contexts. Students will journal their reflections on these discussions, culminating in a final project, either written or practical.
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Understanding Music for Non-Majors (3 credits)
FAM 1100-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 2:30-3:25 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts
The appreciation of music is enhanced by a deeper knowledge of musical materials and structures. This introductory course will focus on reading and writing music in treble, bass, and C-clefs; using rhythms as complicated as triplets in simple and compound meters; recognizing intervals and chords; and understanding basic forms used in popular and classical music. The skills learned in this course will provide the basis for further study and understanding of music of all genres.
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What’s Hot in Popular Music – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2062-001
FAM 2062-002
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: DC Diversity and Culture, SE Social and Ethical Issues, CM Effective Communication, KI Knowledge Integration

This online course examines current popular music in its trending styles and genres. Students will critique selected songs from the weekly “Billboard” charts and various other media resources, including You Tube and digital download statistics, and consider both the hottest artists as well as promising up-and-comers. Students will develop skills for evaluating artistic intent with respect to lyrics, some basic literary techniques, melody, harmony, rhythm, song form, and psychology, and with a look at cutting edge production techniques. Students will identify and compare unique composing and performing styles of today’s artists and identify links between the music business and societal trends. Weekly activity will include reading, viewing, and listening to examples online and completing assignments on Canopy. No prerequisite. No textbook.
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Women in Music (3 credits)
FAM 2025-001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 11:15 a.m.-12:10 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, KI Knowledge Integration

Women in Music is an historical survey of women’s lives and accomplishments in Western music from the medieval period to the present time. The course includes women of diverse races, classes and cultures, and the historical issues that impacted or limited their work. An examination of women’s roles as composers, performers, and patrons reveals their achievements that have been largely ignored because of their gender. Furthermore, although the cultural and societal values change over time and geographic locations, it is evident that suppression and exploitation are recurring themes with regard to social status, education, economics, politics, religion or racial prejudice.
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Music Performance Classes

Classical Guitar Class (2 credits)
GTAR 1075-001 (U)
GTAR 6075-001 (G)
Tuesday/Thursday 12:20-1:15 p.m.
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking
Applied course in basic guitar skills. Emphasis on playing classical and folk styles. Review of current published methods and materials. Open to non-CCM students. Course repeats each semester. Students provide their own nylon string guitars.
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Group Piano I Non-majors (2 credits)
PIAN 1001-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 10:10-11:05 a.m.)
PIAN 1001-002 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:05-10:00 a.m.)
PIAN 1001-003 (Tuesday/Thursday, 10:10-11:05 a.m.)
PIAN 1001-004 (Tuesday/Thursday, 1:25-2:20 p.m.)
PIAN 1001-005 (Tuesday/Thursday, 12:20-1:15 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration

Designed for those with little or no piano experience; teaches the fundamentals of reading music, playing by ear, using chord charts, and improving finger flexibility.
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Jammin’ with Laptops (3 credits)
FAM 2014-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 11 a.m.-noon)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration
This course will explore the potentials of laptop computers for music making. Various technical topics, including analog v. digital sound, audio software, effects, gear, MIDI and audio programming languages will be surveyed. In addition, a survey of the history of computer music will be conducted by way of an investigation into seminal readings and recordings. Both of these inquiries will provide participants.
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Jammin’ with Laptops – Online (3 credits)
FAM 2023-001
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, SE Social and Ethical Issues, CM Effective Communication, SR Social Responsibility
In this course, you will play, record, and make music with online instruments. There are three units, and each unit includes a distinctive music making session; Individual Session (Unit 1), Collaborative Session (Unit 2), and Creative Jam Session (Unit 3 In the Unit 1, you will individually study the basic knowledge of music making, including identifying musical instruments, playing online instruments, and recording the music that you played through the exercises. In the Midterm Exam, you will be asked to answer the basic knowledge that you have learned so far. In the Unit 2 and 3, you will form your laptop band with your online classmates to play and record music together. In the Unit 2, you will collaborate with 1~2 classmate(s) to complete the assignment together. In the Unit 3, you will collaborate with 2~4 classmates to create your own band under your instruction to direct your band members, and play for your band member’s music under their respective directions. In the Final Exam, you will be asked to answer all the materials that you have learned.
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Piano Lead Sheet Non-majors (3 credits)
PIAN 1003-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 11:15-12:10 p.m.)
PIAN 1003-002 (Tuesday/Thursday, 12:20-1:15 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking

Students will learn how to play piano parts of popular idiom piano pieces. They will learn how to realize chord “lead” sheets and also listen to music to pick up piano accompaniment styles. Learning to read music is not part of this course, although you will learn to read rhythm charts. Music will be chosen from artists such as Coldplay, Rihanna, Bruno Mars, as well as earlier works by Chicago, Motley Crue and John Lennon. Choices will be made depending on the type of accompaniment style you are learning.
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UC Cabaret Singers (0-1 credit)
ENSM 1082 (Monday/Wednesday, 6-7:30 p.m.)

The UC Cabaret Singers seeks to enrich the university experience by providing quality musical experiences for UC students within the context of performance of a variety of choral idioms. Members of the UC Choruses work towards excellence in musical performance with other students who share a common interest in choral music. The ensemble regularly performs on campus, locally, and on national tours.
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UC Men’s Chorus (0-1 credit)
ENSM 1081 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 4-5:30 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

The UC Men’s and Women’s Choruses seek to enrich the university experience by providing students a wide range of aesthetic experiences, introducing them to a variety of musical styles, helping them gain appreciation for tonal sounds, and making connections between music and their own personal lives. Members of the UC Men’s and Women’s Choruses will work toward excellence in performance with other students who share a common interest in choral music. The ensembles regularly perform on campus, locally and on annual national tours.
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UC Symphony Orchestra (0-1 credit)
ENSM 2091 (Tuesday, 8-10 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

The UC Symphony Orchestra is specifically for and is designed to provide students with an opportunity to rehearse and perform great orchestral repertoire. Membership in the orchestra is open to instrumentalists who own their own instrument, have a basic technical proficiency, and the ability to read music. Specific seating assignments in the orchestra are determined by informal auditions at the start of each quarter.
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UC Women’s Chorus (0-1 credit)
ENSM 1085 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 4-5:30 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

The UC Men’s and Women’s Choruses seek to enrich the university experience by providing students a wide range of aesthetic experiences, introducing them to a variety of musical styles, helping them gain appreciation for tonal sounds, and making connections between music and their own personal lives. Members of the UC Men’s and Women’s Choruses will work toward excellence in performance with other students who share a common interest in choral music. The ensembles regularly perform on campus, locally and on annual national tours.
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Voice Class (1-2 credits)
VOIC 1075-001 (Thursday, 2-2:55 p.m.)
VOIC 1075-002 (Tuesday, 4-4:55 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking

Voice Class is intended to impart the rudiments of classical vocal technique. Topics addressed include breathing for singing, phonation, anatomy of the breathing process, anatomy of the larynx, posture, vowel formation, and characteristics of consonant sounds. The class will culminate in the student performing a song in English.
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Theatre Appreciation Classes

Acting for Non-Majors (3 credits)
FAM 1001-001 (Monday/Wednesday, 1-2:20 p.m.)
FAM 1001-002 (Monday/Wednesday, 6-7:20 p.m.)
FAM 1001-003 (Monday/Wednesday, 4-5:20 p.m.)
FAM 1001-004 (Monday/Wednesday, 2:30-3:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication

An introductory course in the craft of acting designed for University students interested in theatre performance. Students will work on unscripted material in group improvisations and scripted material in the presentation of monologues or scenes. Basic actor vocabulary common to all styles of performance will be taught.
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Hamilton: A Musical Theatre Revolution (3 credits)
FAM 2075-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, DC Diversity and Culture, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration, SR Social Responsibility

Lin-Manuel Miranda’s musical, Hamilton, has been credited as revolutionary and a game changer in the history of the American musical since its off-Broadway opening in 2015. This course explores the revolutionary aspect of this musical, covering song and plot conventions of musical theater as they appear in musicals from the 1920s to the present and investigating how Miranda employs, challenges, and transforms them in Hamilton. We will also consider Hamilton among other “history musicals,” its relationship with popular music (especially hip-hop and socio-political issues of race and ethnicity derived from Miranda’s choice to offer a multi-racial cast to represent the Founding Fathers. We will thus contextualize Hamilton in musical theater history and investigate what aspects of the musical are conventional and which ones are original.
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Introduction to Arts Administration for Non-Majors (4 credits)
AADM 5160-001 (U)
AADM 6060-001 (G)
Monday/Wednesday, 9:05-10:45 a.m.
This course offers an introduction to the theory and practice of American not-for-profit arts administration/management. The course opens with an introduction to the not-for-profit profit sector. The not-for-profit arts sector is then examined in this context. The second section of the course consists of an overview of the principles and practice of not-for-profit arts administration/management. The topics of mission, governance and leadership, human resources, strategic and financial management and the development of revenue resources to support mission are covered. Through readings, lectures and class discussions, students will apply those principles to the case study of an actual organization and, time permitting, will model the creation of an organizational plan outline for a small not-for-profit performing arts organization.
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Introduction to Stage Lighting and Sound (3 credits)
THPR 1020C-001 (Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-10:50 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking

In this course, the student will learn hands on skills with lighting and sound equipment, while discovering the ways in which modern technology can be effectively applied as a key production element in drama, musical theatre, opera and dance. Through experiences both practical and theoretical, each student will gain operational skills, and recognize the importance of teamwork and collaboration in creating art and discovering a personal aesthetic.
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Stage Lighting Lab and Crew for Non-Majors (1-2 credits)
THPR 1018C-001 (Friday, 10:10-11:05 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking

Practical production undergraduate crew work in the execution of stage lighting designs for major opera, musical theatre, dance and dramatic productions. Each student will practice their understanding in accomplishing the execution of a realized lighting design project(s). Non-typical work session hours required (evening and weekends) for installation and running crews for productions. May be repeated for credit.
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Theatre History for Non-Majors (3 credits)
DRPF 2054 001 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 11:15-12:10 p.m.)
DRPF 2054 002 (Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 2:30-3:25 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, HP Historical Perspectives, CT Critical Thinking

History of Theatre is a chronological look at the rise of Western theatre from ancient times to the Renaissance. The course examines how theatre emerges, its dramatic structure, styles of acting, various visual elements, and different production techniques. The course also explores how theatre artisans built upon the experiences of one another, introduces key figures from theatre history and shows how theatre continues to influence us today.
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Registration Information

UC students can register for classes online at https://www.catalyst.uc.edu.

CCM News Faculty Fanfare Student Salutes

CCM Announces 2019 Opera Scholarship Competition Winners

Artist Diploma candidate Yi Li with Mark Gibson and the CCM Philharmonia.

Six students won awards in CCM’s 2019 Opera Scholarship Competition, which was held on Saturday, March 16, 2019 at Corbett Auditorium.

Since its inauguration in 1976, the annual competition welcomes current and incoming CCM voice students to compete for scholarships and cash prizes, and a panel of judges composed of opera industry professionals selects each year’s class of prizewinners.

The 2019 CCM Opera Scholarship Competition winners are:

Victor Cardamone, first-year Master of Music student
From Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Studying at CCM with Tom Baresel
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the Corbett Award ($15,000)
The Corbett Award is supported by the Corbett Foundation in cooperation with CCM.

Carlos Cardenas, first-year Artist Diploma student
From Bogota, Columbia; Studying at CCM with Daniel Weeks
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the Italo Tajo Memorial Award ($15,000)
This award is supported by the Italo Tajo Memorial Scholarship Fund (established by Mr. Tajo’s wife Inelda Tajo) in cooperation with CCM.

Samuel Kid, incoming Master of Music student from the University of Michigan
From Ann Arbor, Michigan
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the Andrew White Memorial Award ($12,500)
This award is supported by the Andrew White Memorial Scholarship Fund in cooperation with CCM.

Teresa Perrotta, second-year Master of Music student
From Orlando, Florida; Studying at CCM with Gwen Detwiler
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the Seybold-Russell Award ($10,000)
This award is supported by the Seybold-Russell Scholarship Fund in cooperation with CCM.

Amanda Olea, second-year Master of Music student
From Mexico City, Mexico; Studying at CCM with Gwen Detwiler
Prize: Full-tuition scholarship and the John Alexander Memorial Award ($10,000)
This award is supported by the John Alexander Memorial Scholarship Fund in cooperation with CCM.

Maria Miller, first-year Master of Music student
From Paducah, Kentucky; Studying at CCM with Amy Johnson
Prize: Norman Treigle Award ($3000)
This award is supported by the Norman Treigle Opera Scholarship Competition Award Fund in cooperation with CCM.

The judges panel for CCM’s 2019 Opera Scholarship Competition included:

  • Thomas Bankston, Artistic Director of Dayton Opera
  • Lawrence Edelson, Founder and Producing Artistic Director of American Lyric Theater in New York, where he oversees the Composer Librettist Development Program.
  • Neal Goren, Founder and Artistic Director of Catapult Opera, a new touring company premiering in fall 2020 with a new Robert Wilson production of Menotti’s Amahl and the Night Visitors.

About CCM Opera
The Department of Opera at CCM boasts one of the most comprehensive training programs for opera singers, coaches and directors in the United States. Students at CCM work with some of the most renowned teachers and artists active in opera today.

CCM students and alumni frequently advance to the final rounds of the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions. In 2017, four CCM alumni competed in the semi-finals: Jessica Faselt, soprano (MM Voice, 2016); Summer Hassan, soprano (MM Voice, 2014); Andrew Manea, baritone (MM Voice, 2016); and Cody Quattlebaum, bass-baritone (BM Voice, 2015) — who was chosen as a finalist in the national competition. In 2018, former CCM Artist Diploma in Opera Performance student Brandon Scott Russell (MM Voice, 2018; AD Vocal Performance, 2018) took first place at the Met’s National Council Auditions Southeast Regional Competition and went on to compete in the semi-final round. This year, three CCM alumni and students will advance to the Met’s National Council Semi-Finals: Joshua Wheeker, tenor (CCM Voice 2007-2012); Murrella Parton (MM Voice, 2017); and Elena Villalón, soprano, currently studying at CCM with William McGraw. The semi-finals take place in New York on March 24, 2019. Learn more at metopera.org/about/auditions/national-council-auditions/.

In addition, CCM’s Mainstage Opera and Studio Opera Series have received some of the National Opera Association Production Competition’s highest honors throughout the years, taking home six of the 18 non-professional prizes awarded in 2010 and four prizes in 2011.

CCM Opera graduates have performed on the stages of the world’s greatest opera companies, including Cincinnati Opera, Metropolitan Opera (New York), Lyric Opera of Chicago, San Francisco Opera, Royal Opera (London), La Scala (Italy) and more.

CCM’s 2018-19 Mainstage Opera season concludes with W.A. Mozart’s La Clemenza di Tito (The Clemency of Titus), conducted by Jiannan Cheng with stage direction by Robin Guarino. The opera runs April 12-14, 2019 at CCM’s Corbett Auditorium. Learn more about the production at uc.edu/news/articles/2018/09/n201495.html

CCM Alumni Applause CCM News Faculty Fanfare Student Salutes

“Not Famous Yet:” CCM Musical Theatre’s Class of 2019 Presents Senior Showcase

Get a sneak peek at CCM Musical Theatre’s “Not Famous Yet” Showcase on March 15 and 16 before our stars of tomorrow take the show to New York.

Cincinnati audiences can see the first performances of an original showcase created by CCM’s Musical Theatre Class of 2019 on March 15 (CCMpower benefit performance) and 16, 2019, at Patricia Corbett Theater.

Featuring hit songs from Broadway, Off-Broadway and pop music, the Senior Showcase is created by the students themselves under the supervision of Musical Theatre Chair Aubrey Berg and with the assistance of musical director Julie Spangler. Cincinnati performances include the CCMpower benefit event at 7 p.m. on March 15 and the free performances at 2 and 5 p.m. on March 16.

Admission to the performances on March 16 is free and reservations are required; tickets become available at 12:30 p.m. on Monday, March 11 through the CCM Box Office. Event details are below.

CCM’s stars of tomorrow share the musical revue with Cincinnati audiences before they take it to New York, where they present it for leading agents, casting directors and managers in the business. The showcase takes the format of a Broadway audition, with the actors showing off their solo and ensemble skills through song and dance numbers. The Class of 2019 will present their showcase at 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. on Wednesday, April 17, 2019, at New World Stages in New York. For more information and reservations for the showcase in New York, call Patti Hall at 513-556-5803 or email hallpt@ucmail.uc.edu.

Many students are connected with professional performance opportunities shortly after they present the showcase in New York. Such was the case with Paul Schwensen (BFA Musical Theatre, 2017), who auditioned for Miss Saigon after his showcase and is now in the national tour of the musical.

The annual showcase began with the establishment of the Patricia A. Corbett Distinguished Chair of Musical Theatre in 1991. At the time of its inception, it was the only academic chair of its kind in the United States.

Meet CCM Musical Theatre’s Class of 2019

Jordan Alexander is from Sidney, Ohio. He has been seen in The Drowsy Chaperone (Aldolpho), A Raisin in the Sun (Bobo) and West Side Story at Santa Rosa Summer Repertory Theatre. He performed in Gypsy (Tulsa) at Weathervane Playhouse and Runaways (Mex Mongo) at Know Theatre of Cincinnati. At CCM, he appeared in Jesus Christ Superstar (Judas), Lysistrata Jones (Uardo), The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Guys and Dolls, Children of Eden and Big River.

Anya Axel is from Needham, Massachusetts. She has been seen at Kincaid Regional Theatre as Laurey in Oklahoma! and at Reagle Music Theatre in 42nd Street. At CCM, she has appeared in Guys and Dolls (Miss Adelaide), Mack and Mabel (Phyllis Foster), Yeast Nation (Yan the Un-named), A Chorus Line (Tricia, understudy Cassie, Sheila, Maggie), The Merry Widow (Froufrou), American Idiot, Jesus Christ Superstar and Seussical. She originated the role of Ariel in the developmental workshop of Matryoshka at CCM and in New York for Alchemation. Anya is an Equity Membership Candidate.

Bryce Baxter is a native of Fredericksburg, Virginia. He has been seen as Davey in Newsies and Josh in 9 to 5 at Porthouse Theatre in Akron, and as Franz in Rock of Ages and Ru in Merrily We Roll Along at Santa Rosa Summer Repertory Theatre. At CCM, Bryce has performed in The Hunchback of Notre Dame (Frollo), Godspell (Sonia), Jesus Christ Superstar (Jesus), Sondheim on Sondheim (Matthew Scott), Children of Eden (Adam) and Runaways (Iggy). Bryce is a proud member of AEA.

Aria Braswell is from San Antonio, Texas. Her credits include The Little Mermaid (Ariel), Cabaret and Oliver at Clinton Area Showboat, and Grease and The Man Who Came to Dinner at Wagon Wheel. At CCM, she has performed in Guys and Dolls (Sarah Brown), Sondheim on Sondheim (Erin Mackey), The Merry Widow, Jesus Christ Superstar, Mack and Mabel and the premiere of They Were You: The Songs of Tom Jones and Harvey Schmidt. Her film credits include Mystery Diagnosis for the Discovery Health Channel. Aria released her debut album, Lady Nobody, in May 2018.

Kevin Chlapecka is from Chicago, Illinois. He has been seen in Sister Act and Ghost, the Musical at Lake Dillon Theatre Company, Footloose (Ren) at Kincaid Regional Theatre and Ordinary Days (Warren) at Steel Beam Theatre. At CCM, he appeared in Seussical (Cat in the Hat), Guys and Dolls (Nathan Detroit), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (Clopin), Big River (The King), Mack and Mabel (Kessel) and A Chorus Line. Kevin is an Equity Membership Candidate.

Dylan Dougal is from Rochester, New York. He has performed in Oklahoma! (Curly) at Kincaid Regional Theatre and Runaways (AJ) at the Know Theatre of Cincinnati. At CCM, he has been seen in The Hunchback of Notre Dame (Saint Aphrodisius), The Theory of Relativity (Oliver), Children of Eden (Ham) and Guys and Dolls.

Kendall McCarthy is from Raleigh, North Carolina. She played Ariel in Footloose at Kincaid Regional Theater, Pilar in Legally Blonde and Mary Magdalene in Jesus Christ Superstar at North Carolina Theater and Young Groupie in Rock of Ages at Lake Dillon Theater Company. At CCM, she performed as Adelaide in Guys and Dolls, Julie in The Theory of Relativity, Aphra/Eve understudy in Children of Eden, Florika in The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Deidre in Runaways and Gertrude understudy in Seussical. She appears in the films Changeover, Pills, Grace Running and A View from the Bay. Kendall is an Equity Membership Candidate.

Jenny Mollet is from the Bronx, New York. She appeared in Oprah Winfrey’s Broadway production of The Color Purple (Young Celie/Henrietta) and H2O: A Play About Water at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. She can be seen in the music video of Eve Ensler’s “One Billion Rising.” At CCM, she appeared in Lysistrata Jones (Myrhrinne), Big River (Alice), Seussical (Sour Kangaroo), Godspell (Joanne) and The Hunchback of Notre Dame (Esmeralda). She performed with the University of Cincinnati Marching Band at home games during football season. She has appeared in workshops of new works including Nasha America for Alchemation and is featured on Juel Anthony’s EP available on iTunes. Jenny is a proud member of AEA.

Dylan James Mulvaney is from San Diego, California. He has performed in How the Grinch Stole Christmas at the Old Globe, Sons of the Prophet and Spring Awakening at Cygnet Theatre Company, Peter Pan and All Shook Up at Moonlight Stage and Oklahoma! at the Welk Resort. He received a Stage Scene LA award for his work as Peter in Bare: A Pop Opera at Diversionary Theatre. At CCM, he has been seen in Godspell, The Theory of Relativity, Seussical, Mack and Mabel and Runaways. He performed at Joe’s Pub with The Skivvies and in the LA/NYC reading of Living Over the Rainbow. His film and television experience include the current pilot of Love Not Likes, 7th Heaven and Awkwardness. Dylan is an EMC.

Bryn Purvis is from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. She has performed in Legally Blonde (understudy Pilar, Brooke) at the Lexington Theatre Company, and in Cabaret and A Chorus Line (Bebe) at Summer Lyric Theatre. At CCM, she was seen in Seussical (Mayzie LaBird), A Chorus Line (Kristine), Guys and Dolls (Mimi/Dance Captain), Mack and Mabel, Jesus Christ Superstar, The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Duke Ellington’s The Nutcracker Suite. Bryn is an Equity Membership Candidate.

Alex Stone is from McLean, Virginia. He has been seen in Newsies (Jack Kelly) at Tulane Summer Lyric Theatre, Dial M for Murder, The 39 Steps, The Bridges of Madison County and Footloose at the Clinton Area Showboat, and in Aftershocks at Signature Theatre. At CCM, he performed in Mack and Mabel (Mack Sennett), Jesus Christ Superstar (Judas), Sondheim on Sondheim (Tom Wopat), Runaways (Eddie), American Idiot and The Hunchback of Notre Dame (Quasimodo). Other credits include the developmental workshops of Home Street Home and Nasha America (Yasha) for Alchemation. Alex is an Equity Membership Candidate.

Frankie Thams is from Detroit, Michigan. He has performed in Mamma Mia (Eddie) at Stages St. Louis and in Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (Joseph), Hairspray (Link Larkin) and Annie Get Your Gun at Tulane Summer Lyric Theater. He was also in The Pirates of Penzance (Frederic) at Shenandoah Summer Music Theatre. At CCM, he performed The Hunchback of Notre Dame (Phoebus), Guys and Dolls (Sky Masterson), The Theory of Relativity (Ryan), Seussical (Horton), Mack and Mabel, A Chorus Line, American Idiot and Carousel. He appeared in the developmental workshop of Nasha America for Alchemation. Frankie is an Equity Membership Candidate.

Zach Triska is from Chicago, Illinois. He has performed in Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (Zebulun) at Totem Pole Playhouse, Footloose (Willard) at Kincaid Regional Theatre and Iggy in Runaways at the Know Theatre of Cincinnati. At CCM, his credits include Children of Eden (Cain), in The Theory of Relativity (Adam) and Seussical. He appeared in the developmental workshop of Home Street Home for Alchemation. He served as Assistant Director for the CCM production of Godspell. Zach is an Equity Membership Candidate.

Madelaine Vandenberg is from Ithaca, New York. She has appeared as Natalie in Next to Normal at Porthouse Theatre and Urinetown at Cider Mill Playhouse. At CCM, she has been seen in A Chorus Line (Bebe), American Idiot (Libby), Children of Eden (Aysha understudy Mama Noah), Seussical, Jesus Christ Superstar and The Hunchback of Notre Dame. She was seen in the developmental workshops of Home Street Home (Trashley) and Nasha America (Loretta) for Alchemation. Madelaine is an Equity Membership Candidate.

About CCM Musical Theatre
The Musical Theatre program at CCM is the oldest in the country and was the first of its kind. It was used by the National Association of Schools of Theatre in formulating the guidelines for the accreditation of Musical Theatre programs nationwide. Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, CCM Musical Theatre took the #3 spot in Playbill Magazine’s list of “10 Most Represented Colleges on Broadway” in the 2018-19 season. CCM Musical Theatre is widely recognized for its “triple-threat” approach to training and many of its graduates are following careers as performers and creative artists in every facet of the entertainment industry.

New York Showcase Performance Times
CCM’s Musical Theatre Class of 2019 presents its showcase to industry professionals. For more information and reservations, call Patti Hall at 513-556-5803 or email hallpt@ucmail.uc.edu.

Performance Times
3 p.m. and 6 p.m. on Wednesday, April 17

Location
New World Stages
340 W 50th Street, New York, New York 10019

Additionally, the Class of 2019 will join Musical Theatre graduates from the last five decades at two gala cabaret performances at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 16 Feinstein’s/54 Below in New York. For reservations, visit 54below.com/events/ccm-golden-anniversary-celebration.

Cincinnati Showcase Performance Times

  • 7 p.m. Friday, March 15 *CCMpower Benefit
  • 2 p.m. Saturday, March 16
  • 5 p.m. Saturday, March 16

*The CCMpower Benefit performance is followed with wine and dinner-by-the-bite in CCM’s Atrium. The event also includes the presentation of the Musical Theatre Young Alumni Award to Kristy Cates (BFA Musical Theatre, 1999). Cates was a member of the original Broadway cast of Wicked and went on to play Elphaba in the acclaimed production of the musical in Chicago. CCMpower Benefit performance details and ticketing information is available online at ccm.weshareonline.org/NotFamousYetShowcase2019

Admission
Admission to the performances on March 16 is FREE. Seating is limited and reservations are required. Tickets become available at 12:30 p.m. on Monday, March 11. Visit the CCM Box Office or call 513-556-4183 to reserve. Limit two tickets per order.

To reserve a ticket to the CCMpower Benefit performance on March 15, call CCM External Relations at 513-556-2100 or visit ccm.weshareonline.org/NotFamousYetShowcase2019.

Location
Patricia Corbett Theater, CCM Village
University of Cincinnati

Parking and Directions
Parking is available in the CCM Garage (located at the base of Corry Boulevard off Jefferson Avenue) and additional garages throughout the UC campus. Please visit uc.edu/parking for information on parking rates.

For detailed maps and directions, please visit uc.edu/visitors. Additional parking is available off-campus at the U Square complex on Calhoun Street and other neighboring lots.

For directions to CCM Village, visit ccm.uc.edu/about/directions.

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Musical Theatre Senior Showcase Sponsor: Elizabeth C. B. & Paul G. Sittenfeld

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